NSW mother and father fight over autistic son’s burial

Children of a boy that died at a Newcastle swimming pool at October have every cited ancestral culture.

At the NSW Supreme Court on Monday, lawyers for Te Rina Abraham along with Steven Henry, that divide up after the arrival of their son Pono, every promised for his body to be released to their client, not the parent.

‘There is not any ideal answer, there is’ the daddy’s barrister, Jane Needham SC, told Justice Stephen Rothman.

Pono, that suffered brain damage in 2013 in a road accident, died on October 17 after an incident at the Lambton Pool at Newcastle.

Children of a 17-year-old boy (pictured) who perished at a Newcastle swimming pool at October have every cited ancestral culture within their own court battle over whether he should be buried or cremated

Pono, that suffered brain damage in a road accident in 2013, died after an incident at the Lambton Pool at Newcastle (pictured) on October 17

Was treated following an incident in.

Witnesses asserted while he was trapped Pono hit his head on the floor.

He’d serious head injuries that are self-inflicted when paramedics arrived.

After his death, MsĀ Abraham showed since being hit by a vehicle while riding his bicycle, that her son had battled with health issues.

The teen lived in Newcastle, his father is in Queensland along with even though New Zealand is now lived in by his mom.

Ms Abraham’s barrister, Patricia Lane, stated the mother wants her son to have a warrior burial in New Zealand in accordance.

She referred to signs concerning the soul of a dead person napping.

At the NSW Supreme Court on Monday, lawyers for Te Rina Abraham along with Steven Henry, that divide up shortly after the arrival of their son Pono (envisioned), every promised for his body to be released to their customer, not another parent

The disabled adolescent, who was at the pool with his carer, was treated following an incident in

Witnesses asserted while he was pinned down, Pono hit his head on the floor

Ms Abraham didn’t want her son to be cremated but returned into the ground.

Ms Needham reported that the father wanted his son before he was cremated, to have a Maori funeral, with a half of his ashes visiting his mother who may take them back.

This suggestion included ‘the best good for the best number’, she submitted.

‘[Pono] needed a lifetime in Australia and that he did not want to go back into New Zealand.’

Ms Needham cited evidence by a Maori woman who stated it was not taboo to have a whole person cremated and it was not unknown to occur in Maori culture.

‘She says it is virtually unknown to have a (Maori) funeral where there’s not a dispute about where people should be buried, ”’ she added.

Justice Rothman is expected to hand down his decision within the next few days.

Justice Rothman is expected to hand down his decision within the next few days