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Naomi Osaka Father, Mother (Parents), Sister, Family, Bio, Ethnicity 

It’s undeniable that women have become the dominant figures in the game of tennis. There are so many of them that have made giant strides in the game; thus finding their way to superstardom. The Women’s Tennis Association has been uniting women from all races across the world and raising stars such as Naomi Osaka. Naomi is a Japanese-American professional tennis player currently ranked 19th in the women’s singles and 324th in world’s women doubles.

Starting her career in 2013, Osaka has participated in various tournaments including the Australian Open, French Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. Although she has not held any world championship title; Naomi Osaka has competed against big names in the sports like Maria Sharapova, Serena Williams, Simona Halep, and Angelique Kerber, just to mention a few. Learn more about the fast-rising tennis star below.

Naomi Osaka Bio: Age and Ethnicity

The women’s tennis star was born as Naomi Osaka in Osaka Japan on October 16, 1997. She was born to a Haitian father and a Japanese mother. She grew up with her older sister Mari Osaka. When Osaka was three years old, her family moved to the United States where she completed her basic education. Naomi attended Elmont Alden Terrace Primary School and after her graduation; she enrolled at Broward Virtual Middle High School. At the completion of her basic education, Naomi went to Florida Tennis SBT Academy as well as ProWorld Tennis Academy. She is of Japanese-Haitian ethnicity and holds a dual citizenship of Japan and America.

Professional Career

At the inception of her professional tennis career, her father opted she should register with the Japanese Tennis Association. Naomi Osaka began her career journey in 2012 when she participated in the ITF Circuit competitions. She turned pro in 2013 and further made her first professional appearance at the WTA’s Bank of the West Classic Tour in 2014. She recorded her first professional win against the US Open Champion Samantha Stosur.

In 2015, Naomi won the Rising Stars Invitational exhibition tournament; thus beating Carolina Garcia to win the tournament. She made her grand slam debut during the Australian Open; nevertheless, she lost out in the third round to Victoria Azarenka. In the same year, she also reached the third round in the French Open. After her triumph over Jelena Ostapenko and Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, she was defeated by Simona Halep.

The amazing tennis prodigy got her breakthrough at the 2016 Toray Pan Pacific Open where she beat Elina Svitolina, Misaki Doi, Aliaksandra Sasnovich, and Dominika Cibulkova to reach the finals of the competition. Unfortunately, she lost to Caroline Wozniacki. After the competition, Naomi entered the Top 50 WTA rankings. She also won the newcomer of the year award during the 2016 WTA Awards.

In 2017, she participated in the Australian Open winning her first-round game and losing to Johanna Konta in the second round of the tournament. She also lost out in the second round of the Dubai Tennis Championship to Christina McHale.  She triumphed over Venus Williams at the Hong Kong Open in October 2017 but was beaten in the quarterfinal by Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. In the same year, Naomi also took part in the Eastbourne International Tournament, Nottingham Open, Miami Open, and Volvo Car Open, among others.

Additionally, Naomi clinched her first Premier Mandatory title in 2018 after her impressive performance at the BNP Paribas Open. She defeated world No 1 Simona Halep to advance to the final; thus beating Russian’s Daria Kasatkina to with the premier mandatory title. She also reached her first grand slam quarter-final after beating Aryna Sabalenka. Naomi Osaka will face Lesia Tsurenko in the next round of the tournament. Meanwhile, she reached the third round of the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and French Open in the same.

Family: Father, Mother (Parents) and Sister

Like we aforementioned, Naomi Osaka was born to Haitian father Leonard Francois and a Japanese mother Tamaki Osaka. Her father was born and raised in Haiti; he moved to the United States where he attended New York University. Upon graduation, he went to Japan where he met and married Naomi’s mother. Three years after Naomi was born, her family relocated to the United States and they currently reside in Florida.

See Also: Who Is Julia Goerges? Her Husband, Boyfriend, Height, Weight, Body Stats

Naomi has an older sister named Mari Osaka. Apparently, the two sisters are both professional tennis players. Mari made her first professional appearance at the WTA 2014 Bank of the West Classic Tour. Although she lost in the doubles, she paired with Marina Shamayko. She is a three-time runner-up in three singles finals, first in Amelia Island tour in 2012 and subsequently, Goyang, South Korea tour and Denain, France tour in 2017. Interestingly, the two sisters have played together in doubles tennis. While Naomi currently ranks 19th in the WTA Women Singles, Mari, on the other hand, ranks 289 as of 2018.

5 Things Parents Must Tell Their Children – Parent on Purpose

We parents today are fantastic at telling our babies how wonderful they are at everything they do.

We slap stickers of their sports team logos and the schools they attend on the backs of the cars that we shuttle them around in.

We happily tout their sports victories and weekend wins on social media for all to see.

We parents are proud of our kids.

Perhaps what our kids need from us more than constant pats on the back is a healthier dose of reality. Along with telling Johnny what a gift to the world he is, we need to also make sure he understands these things…

1. Life is hard and full of disappointment

Don’t shield your child from this harsh reality. It’s best our kids begin to understand now that not everyone gets a medal. Suck it up buttercup, because sometimes you will win and sometimes you will lose. Sometimes we get what we want and sometimes we don’t. Difficult things happen to good people.

Let’s raise some mentally tough kids who don’t fold at the first sign of struggle. I want my young adults resilient enough to work through their disappointments before seeking out a crying room at college because their feelings are hurt. Sometimes the truth is painful.

Parents pay attention to how you are modeling life when it get’s difficult for you. How you handle life’s ups and downs will rub off on your kids.

2. You are not special

Okay, that may be a little harsh for this generation to handle, but life is not supposed to revolve around your kid. In our mission to raise children of high self-esteem, we have mistakingly placed our wee ones as the top priority in our lives.

Be mindful of how you are praising and building your children up because it can actually be to their detriment. The more we put our children on a pedestal, the tougher it’s going to be to get them down. I believe in unconditionally loving my offspring and placing high value on their hearts and minds, but I never want to raise them to believe they are better than the next guy.

3. Life must not be lived in comparison to others

Who cares if everyone’s doing IT or that so and so has IT? I tell my kids that I don’t care what the Joneses are up to or what they possess. More power to them, but it doesn’t mean IT fits in with our family plan.

I want to raise children who understand the importance of running their own race. People who don’t need to post their acquired material items on social media to gain approval. I want them to be confidant in who God made them to be as original, interesting, one-of-a-kind human beings.

Talk to your kids about not believing the hype they see on social media and how we should strive to live a better life off-screen than the one we portray online.

4. NO… to things we adults can afford

Why are kids without jobs walking around in designer shoes, ordering gourmet coffees with expensive iPhones in their back pocket? Few teens earn a paycheck these days, yet they have all the perks of hard-working, wage-earning adults. It blows my mind. Remember back in the day, if we didn’t have the cash in hand, we weren’t doing it or buying it period. Let’s channel some of that old school mentality, shall we?

Kids use phone apps to catch rides from strangers and even have meals or iced coffee drinks delivered to them, all on their parents’ dime. I’ve seen it with my own eyes people. Begin saying no to wants that you can afford but that your child cannot. Perhaps that may just catapult them into wanting to get a job and learn the value of hard work through earning their own cash. Just a crazy thought.

5. You can do hard things

Encourage areas that challenge your child to grow and learn instead of letting them take the easiest path. I’ve heard parents say they don’t have their kids take certain classes at school because they’re too hard. Others have teenagers who are scared or don’t see a need to obtain their driver’s licenses so parents continue to shuttle their capable child around. What happened to pushing our kids a bit out of their comfort zone?

Don’t be so quick to allow your child to quit when life gets challenging either. Know your kid well enough to know when to push them in areas which may benefit them in the long run. Our son wouldn’t be enjoying playing high school baseball today if we’d let him quit the sport when he thought he wanted to a few years ago. That same son is surprising himself earning A’s in a tough honors language arts class that he was adamant he didn’t want to take too. Good for him.

Let’s continue to pat little Johnny on the back while we explain to him how reality really works. Our kids must understand and learn from us that the world can be a tough place and that they are going to be just fine.

What other things must we tell our wonderful children in order to raise healthy and resilient young adults?

The French Parliament voted in a bill indicating that parents of school children are no longer to be called ‘father’ or ‘mother’ but rather ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2′ on school forms | Stand for Christians

French deputies approved an amendment to a draft plan to build a so-called “School of Trust” by indicating that the terms ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2’ replace ‘mother’ and ‘father’ in school records.

In 2012, the newspaper Liberation wrote about the positive aspects of the introduction of these terms. Until then, it was just a liberal theoretical conception. But on Tuesday, the 12th of February, the French Parliament added an amendment to the “School of Trust” draft,  implementing the proposed changes. Seven years after the curious musings of the Liberation newspaper, what seemed then to be comical is soon to become a reality.  

The terms referred to in the amendment are not new. They were already in use when the French parliament voted about ‘marriage for everyone,’ in May of 2013. In fact, in an article in  2012 , the same newspaper heralded these new terms as a sign of social development. The periodical did mention however that many schools and indeed the Catholic Church were against these new classifications.

An example of Church opposition to the terms can be seen in the “Collectif pour l’Enfant” Catholic website that posted the following: “The parliament does not have  the right to classify every parent mentioned as ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2.’” The website asks that if sexual difference in parenthood no longer matters, then for example, in the case of adoption, why should there be only two parents, and not three or four to adopt a baby?

Many members of the French Parliament are opposed to the amendment to the draft.

Jean-Michel Blanquer, the minister of Education, and Anne-Christine Lang are against the change. Curiously, AFDH, the French association for same sex parents notes that the terms could create a problem of ‘parental hierarchy’ and generate confusion about who is ‘parent number 1’ and who is ‘parent number 2?’ Another deputy, Xavier Breton, said that this new method would not be in harmony with reality given that today 95% of the couples or spouses in France are composed of a man and a woman.

The decision of the French Parliament caused controversy not only in the parliament and among citizens, but across the whole of European society. People who consider themselves traditional or religious are criticising the French for this bill, and many say that the country is now on a slippery slope.

Source: Aleteia

The French Parliament voted in a bill indicating that parents of school children are no longer to be called ‘father’ or ‘mother’ but rather ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2′ on school forms | Stand for Christians

French deputies approved an amendment to a draft plan to build a so-called “School of Trust” by indicating that the terms ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2’ replace ‘mother’ and ‘father’ in school records.

In 2012, the newspaper Liberation wrote about the positive aspects of the introduction of these terms. Until then, it was just a liberal theoretical conception. But on Tuesday, the 12th of February, the French Parliament added an amendment to the “School of Trust” draft,  implementing the proposed changes. Seven years after the curious musings of the Liberation newspaper, what seemed then to be comical is soon to become a reality.  

The terms referred to in the amendment are not new. They were already in use when the French parliament voted about ‘marriage for everyone,’ in May of 2013. In fact, in an article in  2012 , the same newspaper heralded these new terms as a sign of social development. The periodical did mention however that many schools and indeed the Catholic Church were against these new classifications.

An example of Church opposition to the terms can be seen in the “Collectif pour l’Enfant” Catholic website that posted the following: “The parliament does not have  the right to classify every parent mentioned as ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2.’” The website asks that if sexual difference in parenthood no longer matters, then for example, in the case of adoption, why should there be only two parents, and not three or four to adopt a baby?

Many members of the French Parliament are opposed to the amendment to the draft.

Jean-Michel Blanquer, the minister of Education, and Anne-Christine Lang are against the change. Curiously, AFDH, the French association for same sex parents notes that the terms could create a problem of ‘parental hierarchy’ and generate confusion about who is ‘parent number 1’ and who is ‘parent number 2?’ Another deputy, Xavier Breton, said that this new method would not be in harmony with reality given that today 95% of the couples or spouses in France are composed of a man and a woman.

The decision of the French Parliament caused controversy not only in the parliament and among citizens, but across the whole of European society. People who consider themselves traditional or religious are criticising the French for this bill, and many say that the country is now on a slippery slope.

Source: Aleteia

French Schools To Use Parent 1 & 2 Instead Of Mother & Father

While a lot of countries, including India, are trying to approach the legalisation of gay marriage, the French had done it way back in 2013. However, there were some kinks in their system that prevented the inclusion of gay couples, one of which was smoothed out by Emmanuel Macron’s government this week.

According to the Telegraph, French schools have been advised to replace the words ‘mother’ and ‘father’ with ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2’ under an amendment to a law passed recently. Valérie Petit, MP for the majority REM party of Pres. Emmanuel Macron, said,

“This amendment aims to root in law children’s family diversity in administrative forms submitted in school. We have families who find themselves faced with tick boxes stuck in rather old-fashioned social and family models. For us, this article is a measurement of social equality.”

Socialist MP Joaquim Pueyot praised the reform as a sign of “respect and dignity” and said,

“You cannot imagine the consequences when children don’t feel treated like the others.”

FCPE (which’s France’s biggest parents federation) called this amendment “a very good thing” and said that it echoed the law that has been passed to protect children who are harassed for not fitting certain criteria.

Apparently, the idea of replacing mother and father with parent 1 and 2 was already denied back in 2013. And since it was passed this time, it left the conservative Republicans and the far-Right fuming. Conservative MP Fabien Di Filippo defined the move as,

“Frightening ideology, which in the name of limitless egalitarianism promotes removing points of reference, including those regarding the family.”

Eric Ciotti, another RW MP said that,

“They swore this was fantasy, that it would never happen. The negation of gender deconstructs the balance of our society.”

Ludovine de La Rochère, president of the Manif Pour Tous organisation that opposes gay marriage, said that the move was “totally dehumanising”. In addition to that Jordan Bardella, head of RN’s European election list said that this is an attempt to “ideologically condition children”.

However, it wasn’t just the Right who displayed scepticism regarding this decision. AFDH (the French association for same-sex parents) warned that ‘parent 1’ and ‘parent 2’ can cause “parental hierarchy”. Jean-Michel Aphatie, editorialist on Europe 1 radio has said that while the change was logical, turning parents into numbers was “very administrative and very ugly”.

What are your thoughts on this move? Let us know in the comments.

Representative Cover Image Source: 1, 2

France: “Mother and Father” are Now “Parent 1 and Parent 2”

Andrew Anglin
Daily Stormer
February 15, 2019

How is it that everyone does not find this situation absolutely grotesque?

You know who doesn’t find vile changes to the natural order grotesque, other than Jews?

Women.

RT:

French schools are set to replace the words ‘mother’ and ‘father’ with ‘Parent 1’ and ‘Parent 2’ following an amendment to a law which passed through French Parliament this week.

The new naming convention is ostensibly aimed at ending discrimination against same sex parents but critics argue that it “dehumanises” parenthood and may lead to rows over who gets classified as ‘Parent 1.’

The amendment, passed Tuesday as part of a wider plan to build a so-called “school of trust,” will also enforce mandatory school attendance for all three-year-olds.

“This amendment aims to root in law children’s family diversity in administrative forms submitted in school,” said Valérie Petit, MP for the majority REM party of President Emmanuel Macron.

“We have families who find themselves faced with tick boxes stuck in rather old-fashioned social and family models. For us, this article is a measurement of social equality.”

“I have already written that I’m particularly shocked and surprised at the ‘controversy’ around the parent/mother/Father forms,” Israeli-French former journalist Julien Bahloul, himself a same-sex parent, tweeted. “The mother and father are parents, nothing insulting to that. In #TelAviv the forms were changed a long time ago without any worries.

The proposal to eliminate the terms “mother” and “father” in favor of more inclusive, gender non-specific language has been around since the 2013 debates held prior to the legalisation of same sex marriage.

Yes, you see.

Women and Jews.

This is only going to get worse.