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School wants parents to take responsibility – now their poster is spreading like wildfire online

It’s a timeless question: where do a school’s responsibilities begin, and where do they end?

This is especially relevant when considering where to draw the line between what constitutes parents’ responsibilities and a school’s.

A Portuguese school decided to clarify the matter once and for all, by sticking a poster in its halls- and the message they’re sending is now spreading like wildfire.  

The school’s sign was later shared on Facebook, where the message contained within it quickly began to spread around the world. 

The simple but effective messager highlights five key points which the school is determined should be managed by the parents, as follows:

  • We would like to remind you that magic words such as hello, please, you’re welcome, I’m sorry, and thank you, all begin to be learned at home
  • It’s also at home that children learn to be honest, to be on time, diligent, show friends their sympathy, as well as show utmost respect for their elders and all teachers.
  • Home is where they learn to be clean, not talk with their mouths full, and how/where to properly dispose of garbage.
  • Home is also where they learn to be organized, to take good care of their belongings, and that it’s not ok to touch others.
  • Here at school, on the other hand, we teach language, math, history, geography, physics, sciences, and physical education. We only reinforce the education that children receive at home from their parents.
school

The online response has been immediate. 

Do you think that schools in the US should be posting this in their hallways, too? Share if you agree that parents need to take responsibility for their children’s behavior!

School wants parents to take responsibility – now their poster is spreading like wildfire online

Newsner»Family»School wants parents to take responsibility – now their poster is spreading like wildfire online

Time parents spend with children key to academic success : Parenting : Parent Herald

The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce.

They found that when it came to one measure of a child’s academic success, the educational attainment of the surviving or custodial parent had more impact than the educational level of the parent who died or left the home.

And the longer the absence of a parent, the less impact his or her education had on the child’s success and the greater the impact of the remaining parent.

“In the ongoing debate over what helps children succeed academically, we show that genetics is not the only major factor,” said Bruce Weinberg, co-author of the study and professor of economics at The Ohio State University.

“It is also about the time that parents spend with their children.”

The research was conducted by Eric Gould and Avi Simhon of Hebrew University in Israel, as well as Weinberg. The study has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Labor Economics and will be published Feb. 4, 2018 on the website of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

The study involved more than 22,000 children in Israel who lost a parent before age 18, more than 77,000 whose parents divorced and more than 600,000 who did not experience parental death or divorce.

The researchers looked at whether these children passed the “matriculation exam,” a high-stakes test required to attend college. About 57 percent of high-school students in the country pass the test.

The researchers started the study by looking at children who experienced the death of one parent, Weinberg said.

“We found that if a mother dies, her education becomes less important for whether her child passes the test, while at the same time the father’s education becomes more important. If a father dies, the reverse happens,” he said.

“These relationships are stronger when the parent dies when the child is younger.”

In other words, Gould said, parenting matters.

“Student success is not coming just from smart parents having smart kids,” he said.

Study results rejected the argument that the parents’ income is really what helps the children of the highly educated succeed academically.

If that were so, then losing a father should hurt children academically more than losing a mother because fathers tend to earn more.

“That’s not what we found. The loss of a mother – who tends to spend more time than the father with her children – had a bigger effect than loss of a father in our study,” Weinberg said.

But what about parents who remarry after losing a spouse? The study found that the negative effect on academic success of losing a mother can at least be partially minimized if the child gains a stepmother. If the father does not remarry, the effect of the loss is more acute: No one can compensate for the loss of the mother except for the father.

The study didn’t find any differences in academic success for children whose mothers remarried after their father died, versus those who did not. That may be because mothers’ education levels generally had more impact on their children’s success than that of fathers because of the more time moms spend with their kids.

Results also showed that mothers’ education was more closely linked to children’s academic success in larger families. The researchers believe that was because women with more children spent more time with their kids and less time working outside the home, according to findings.

Overall, the effects of losing a parent were stronger on girls than on boys, the study showed.

Similar results were also found with children whose parents had divorced. The educational level of the mother – whom the child typically lived with – had a larger effect on academic success than did the education of the other parent, Weinberg said.

“We found similar results in those children who experienced parental death and parental divorce. That provides strong evidence that our results are more general than just for children who suffered a parental death,” Weinberg said.

“Other studies show that highly educated parents tend to spend more time with their children. Our results may suggest one reason why they do: It has a strong impact on academic success.”

Parents: Keep medical marijuana dispensaries away from children : Parenting : Parent Herald

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — With medical marijuana now legal in about two-thirds of U.S. states, there’s growing concern about how dispensaries may impact surrounding neighborhoods and communities.

And parents in a new national poll overwhelmingly agree on one place dispensaries should not be allowed: anywhere near children.

Seven in 10 parents think they should have a say in whether dispensaries are located near their child’s school or daycare and most say they should be banned within a certain distance of those facilities, according to the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan.

Highest on the list of concerns was the risk impaired drivers may pose to children – with nearly half of parents saying this was a significant worry. A recent study found that more than half of people taking cannabis for chronic pain report driving while high.

“Medical marijuana has become legal in the majority of states but there is wide variation in state and local policies that regulate the location and operation of dispensaries,” says poll co-director Sarah Clark, M.P.H.

“The majority of parents feel strongly that they should give local input on decisions regarding where dispensaries may open and also support limitations on how close dispensaries could be to children’s areas.”

Aside from the top concern involving drivers under the influence, some parents also worried about the possibility of a child finding and ingesting edible marijuana inadvertently left behind by a dispensary customer (48 percent), and teens having easier opportunities accessing marijuana (49 percent.) Other dispensary concerns included setting a bad example for kids (45 percent) and bringing violent crime to the area (35 percent).

Three quarters of parents indicated general support for legal medical marijuana, including one third of parents who support the option for children. Just 26 percent of parents opposed medical marijuana.

At the same time, most parents agreed that dispensaries should be banned within a certain distance of elementary schools, middle and high schools, and daycare centers. Forty-four percent of parents also believed dispensaries should not be close to places of worship. Support for such bans was equally strong among both mothers and fathers, younger and older parents, and parents of higher and lower income.

“Most parents seem to understand that marijuana can have legitimate medical benefits, but parents also have major concerns about the risks that medical marijuana dispensaries might pose to children,” Clark says. “When it comes to where dispensaries are located, many parents feel that any area near children is too close for comfort.”

Most parents (77 percent) agreed that medical marijuana dispensaries should have the same regulations as liquor stores for where they can be located. Meanwhile, 52 percent of parents said dispensaries should have the same rights as other businesses. Nearly all parents (90 percent) felt dispensaries should undergo inspections to ensure they are following all regulations.

Nearly half of parents (45 percent) said that medical marijuana is legal in their state, and 24 percent knew there was at least one medical marijuana dispensary in their community. Only 20 percent reported that their state or community has regulations about where dispensaries can be located, while 59 percent did not know if such regulations exist.

While most parents wanted to be consulted about locating a dispensary near their child’s school or daycare, this may prove difficult, Clark says. There is no consistent state or local framework to regulate the location and operations of dispensaries. Some states may have added legal complexities differentiating the sale of medical versus recreational marijuana.

It may also be confusing about whether parents need to contact elected officials or commissions, and if they should focus on the state or local level when an application is filed for a new dispensary. Decisions about the location of new dispensaries could be made through state law, a local zoning regulation, or other action.

“Parents who want to share their views about dispensaries before any open in their school’s neighborhood may have limited opportunities to do so. They may not even be aware that a specific dispensary location is under consideration until the decision has already been made,” Clark says.

“The lack of established standards may lead officials to enact policies that may not address parents’ concerns,” Clark adds. “Parents who want to provide input about local dispensaries may need to take the initiative to learn about the rules for opening a dispensary in their community and what steps they should follow to be involved in these decisions.”